My name's Toni and I'm 17 years old. I love old films and Katharine Hepburn is one of my favorites. This blog is dedicated to the one and only Katharine Hepburn. I admire her strength, class, beauty, and intelligence. She was and is a woman of greatness.


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Apr 2, 2014
@ 8:45 pm
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bon-aventures:


Two years ago I went to see The Philadelphia Story play on a big screen in Bryant Park. It was July and so hot my brother and I had been spending the day in the penguin exhibit at the zoo, but then we heard about the film— my favorite film— playing outdoors and rushed downtown.
We were too late to get a seat. It was packed like I have never seen any New York open space since the Dalai Lama came to Central Park. We were disconsolately looking for a wall to sit on, when suddenly two unholy fools, two morons, changed their minds and gave up their second-row seats. Hard to describe how happy we were. And then over the loudspeakers came some news: Hepburn had been taken ill in the night — gasps, I mean, real gasps— but it was okay— happy sighs— she was back from the hospital and wished us all well. We roared! And then the film started, and I said all the lines before they came, and my brother asked me to shut up. But I wasn’t the only one at it. When Katharine whispered to Jimmy Stewart, “Put me in your pocket, Mike!” a thousand people whispered with her. That was the best night at the movies I’ve ever had.
Two days ago she died, aged ninety-six. I don’t know why I should be surprised, but I was, and when I found out, I wept, and felt ridiculous for weeping. How can someone you have never met make you cry?

— Zadie Smith [June 2003]

bon-aventures:

Two years ago I went to see The Philadelphia Story play on a big screen in Bryant Park. It was July and so hot my brother and I had been spending the day in the penguin exhibit at the zoo, but then we heard about the film— my favorite film— playing outdoors and rushed downtown.

We were too late to get a seat. It was packed like I have never seen any New York open space since the Dalai Lama came to Central Park. We were disconsolately looking for a wall to sit on, when suddenly two unholy fools, two morons, changed their minds and gave up their second-row seats. Hard to describe how happy we were. And then over the loudspeakers came some news: Hepburn had been taken ill in the night — gasps, I mean, real gasps— but it was okay— happy sighs— she was back from the hospital and wished us all well. We roared! And then the film started, and I said all the lines before they came, and my brother asked me to shut up. But I wasn’t the only one at it. When Katharine whispered to Jimmy Stewart, “Put me in your pocket, Mike!” a thousand people whispered with her. That was the best night at the movies I’ve ever had.

Two days ago she died, aged ninety-six. I don’t know why I should be surprised, but I was, and when I found out, I wept, and felt ridiculous for weeping. How can someone you have never met make you cry?

Zadie Smith [June 2003]

(Source: vistavisions, via myrnasloy)


Photoset

Mar 25, 2014
@ 4:06 pm
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551 notes

aliciahubermans:

The stars are ageless » Katharine Hepburn

“We are taught you must blame your father, your sisters, your brothers, the school, the teachers - but never blame yourself. It’s never your fault. But it’s always your fault, because if you wanted to change you’re the one who has got to change.”

(via tracylord)


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Mar 25, 2014
@ 4:05 pm
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58 notes

theidentitymad:


Katharine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart in The Philadelphia Story (1940)

My reaction when people talk to me

theidentitymad:

Katharine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart in The Philadelphia Story (1940)

My reaction when people talk to me


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Mar 25, 2014
@ 4:04 pm
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36 notes

lottereinigerforever:

Katharine Hepburn & Spencer Tracy in “Adam’s Rib”

lottereinigerforever:

Katharine Hepburn & Spencer Tracy in “Adam’s Rib”


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Mar 25, 2014
@ 4:03 pm
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34 notes

skinnyhipstertittie:

"Children need boundaries, so they can know how far they have to go to get beyond them."
- Katharine Hepburn

skinnyhipstertittie:

"Children need boundaries, so they can know how far they have to go to get beyond them."
- Katharine Hepburn


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Mar 25, 2014
@ 4:02 pm
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10 notes

classicglamourgirl:

Lauren Bacall, director John Huston, Bogie & Katherine Hepburn on the set of “The African Queen” (1951)

classicglamourgirl:

Lauren Bacall, director John Huston, Bogie & Katherine Hepburn on the set of “The African Queen” (1951)


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Mar 14, 2014
@ 5:00 pm
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232 notes


“What a time we had Rosie, what a time we had." -The African Queen (1951)

What a time we had Rosie, what a time we had." -The African Queen (1951)


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Mar 14, 2014
@ 4:59 pm
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3 notes

belaboobs:

katharine hepburn and spencer tracy just break my heart


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Mar 14, 2014
@ 4:57 pm
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31 notes


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Mar 2, 2014
@ 1:39 pm
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37 notes

indypendent-thinking:

Katharine Hepburn in a gown by Adrian

indypendent-thinking:

Katharine Hepburn in a gown by Adrian


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Mar 2, 2014
@ 1:38 pm
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Mar 2, 2014
@ 1:37 pm
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124 notes

screengoddess:

Katharine Hepburn 1936, photo by Ernest A. Bachrach

screengoddess:

Katharine Hepburn 1936, photo by Ernest A. Bachrach


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Mar 2, 2014
@ 1:35 pm
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533 notes

What appealed to me in the idea of Summertime? Loneliness. Why? Because I think that loneliness is in all of us, it is a more common emotion than love, but we speak less about it. We are ashamed of it. We think perhaps that it shows a deficiency in ourselves. That if we were more attractive, more entertaining and less ordinary we would not be lonely.

The film is about a lonely woman who falls in love, and as I know no better remedy for the complaint I hope you will find it sympathetic.

- David Lean


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Mar 1, 2014
@ 4:57 pm
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36 notes

(Source: evagronka, via hepburnandhepburn)


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Feb 25, 2014
@ 4:10 pm
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146 notes

kittypackards:

Katharine Hepburn, 1940.

kittypackards:

Katharine Hepburn, 1940.

(via fuckindiva)